Topic Overview

Try home treatment for blisters:

  • A small, unbroken blister about the size of a pea, even a blood blister, will usually heal on its own. Use a loose bandage to protect it. Avoid the activity that caused the blister.
  • If a small blister is on a weight-bearing area like the bottom of the foot, protect it with a doughnut-shaped moleskin pad . Leave the area over the blister open.
  • If a blister is large and painful, it may be best to drain it. Here is a safe method:
    • Wipe a needle or straight pin with rubbing alcohol.
    • Gently puncture the edge of the blister.
    • Press the fluid in the blister toward the hole so it can drain out.
    • If you have a condition such as diabetes, HIV, cancer, or heart disease, you do not want to drain a blister because of the risk for infection.
  • After you have opened a blister, or if it has torn open:
    • Gently wash the area with clean water. Do not use alcohol, iodine, or any other cleanser.
    • Don't remove the flap of skin over a blister unless it's very dirty or torn or there is pus under it. Gently smooth the flap over the tender skin.
    • Apply a thin layer of petroleum jelly, such as Vaseline, and a nonstick bandage.
    • Change the bandage once a day or anytime it gets wet or dirty. Remove it at night to let the area dry.

Watch for a skin infection while your blister is healing. Signs of infection include:

  • Increased pain, swelling, redness, or warmth around the blister.
  • Red streaks extending away from the blister.
  • Pus draining from the blister.
  • Fever.

Credits

ByHealthwise Staff

Primary Medical Reviewer William H. Blahd, Jr., MD, FACEP - Emergency Medicine

Adam Husney, MD - Family Medicine

Specialist Medical Reviewer H. Michael O'Connor, MD - Emergency Medicine

Current as ofFebruary 23, 2015