Dental Checkups for Children and Adults

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Topic Overview

Infants and preschoolers

By the time your child is 6 months old, your doctor should assess the likelihood of your child having future dental problems. This may include a dental exam of the mother and her dental history, because the condition of her teeth can often predict possible problems with her child's teeth. If the doctor thinks your child will have dental problems, be sure your child sees a dentist by his or her first birthday or 6 months after the first primary teeth appear , whichever comes first. After your first visit, schedule regular visits every 6 months or as your dentist recommends.

Experts recommend that your child's visits to a dentist start within 6 months after the first teeth appear or at 12 months of age, whichever comes first. Babies with dental problems caused by injury, disease, or a developmental problem should be seen by a children's (pediatric) dentist right away. If these dental problems are not limited to the surfaces of the teeth, your baby should also be seen by a children's doctor ( pediatrician ) or your family doctor.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends that your child's doctor: footnote 1

  • Prescribe a fluoride supplement to children 6 months of age and older if their primary water source lacks enough fluoride.
  • Apply fluoride varnish to the primary teeth of all children 5 years of age and younger.

Adults, teens, and school-age children

See your dentist once or twice a year. Your dentist will examine your teeth and gums for signs of tooth decay , gum disease , and other health problems.

  • Your dental hygienist will begin to clean your teeth by scraping hard mineral buildup (tartar) off your teeth with a small metal tool. Then the hygienist will floss your teeth, use a polishing compound, and apply fluoride. Cleanings usually aren't painful.
  • Sometimes your dentist will want to take X-rays . The X-rays take only a few minutes.
    • Your dentist or technician will have you put on a heavy apron to shield your body from X-rays. Everyone else in the room will either wear a protective apron or step behind a protective shield.
    • Your dentist or technician will have you bite down on a small piece of plastic. This will help align your teeth properly for the machine. Your dentist or technician will repeat this process several times to get pictures of all your teeth.
  • If needed, your dentist will put a sealant on the chewing surface of your back teeth to help prevent cavities. Sealants keep food and bacteria from getting stuck in the rough chewing surfaces or grooves of your teeth, and they protect your teeth from plaque .
  • If you are prone to infections, you may need to take antibiotics before you have any dental work. Talk to your dentist or doctor if you have questions about the need for antibiotics. You may need to take antibiotics if you:
    • Have heart valve problems, which put you at risk for endocarditis .
    • Have an impaired immune system .
    • Had recent major surgeries or have man-made body parts, such as an artificial hip or heart valve.
  • Your dentist or hygienist may ask you about the foods you eat. What you eat and whether you get enough vitamins and minerals can affect your dental health.
  • If you have active tooth decay or gum disease, your dentist will talk to you about changing your brushing or flossing habits. In severe cases, he or she may recommend antibiotics or other dental treatments. If your teeth and gums appear to be healthy, your dentist will probably recommend that you continue your usual brushing and flossing routine.

After reviewing all of the research, the USPSTF has not recommended for or against routine screening of adults for oral cancer . footnote 2

For more information, see the topics Basic Dental Care , Tooth Decay , and Oral Cancer .

References

Citations

  1. U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (2014). Prevention of dental caries in children from birth through age 5 years: Recommendation statement. http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/uspstf12/dentalprek/dentchfinalrs.htm. Accessed May 15, 2014.
  2. U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (2004). Screening for oral cancer. Available online: http://www.uspreventiveservicestaskforce.org/uspstf/uspsoral.htm.

Credits

ByHealthwise Staff

Primary Medical Reviewer E. Gregory Thompson, MD - Internal Medicine

Adam Husney, MD - Family Medicine

Specialist Medical Reviewer Arden Christen, DDS, MSD, MA, FACD - Dentistry

Current as ofFebruary 17, 2015