Inherited Blood-Clotting Problems

Inherited Blood-Clotting Problems

Topic Overview

Some people are born with an increased tendency to form blood clots, which increases their risk for developing blood clots in the legs ( deep vein thrombosis ) and in the lungs ( pulmonary embolism ). This tendency is due to inherited blood-clotting irregularities, which are generally related to:

  • Mutated genes (such as factor V Leiden, factor II).
  • Decreased amounts of certain proteins (protein C, protein S, and antithrombin III).
  • Increased levels of other substances (antiphospholipid or lupus anticoagulant).

Many of these blood-clotting irregularities can be identified with special tests. If your doctor suspects that you may have an inherited blood-clotting irregularity, discuss whether testing is needed.

Related Information

References

Other Works Consulted

  • Lipe B, Ornstein DL (2011). Deficiencies of natural anticoagulants, protein C, protein S, and antithrombin. Circulation, 124(14): e365–e368.

Credits

ByHealthwise Staff
Primary Medical ReviewerE. Gregory Thompson, MD - Internal Medicine
Specialist Medical ReviewerJeffrey S. Ginsberg, MD - Hematology
Last RevisedDecember 28, 2011

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