Lupus and Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome

Lupus and Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome

Topic Overview

About 1 out of 3 people with lupus produce an antibody that attacks certain blood-clotting factors, which can cause the blood to clot easily. 1 A person who has this antibody and has had blood clots is said to have antiphospholipid antibody syndrome. This can lead to mild or severe blood-clotting complications, including:

A blood test can detect antiphospholipid antibodies. When diagnosed, the condition is usually treated with anticoagulants . Pregnant women with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome need to be closely monitored.

References

Citations

  1. Crow MK (2012). Systemic lupus erythematosus. In L Goldman, A Schafer, eds., Goldman's Cecil Medicine, 24th ed., pp. 1697–1705. Philadelphia: Saunders.

Credits

ByHealthwise Staff
Primary Medical ReviewerAnne C. Poinier, MD - Internal Medicine
Specialist Medical ReviewerNancy Ann Shadick, MD, MPH - Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Last RevisedMay 10, 2012

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