Suicide Assessment

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Topic Overview

A suicide assessment is used to find out whether a person is at risk for a suicide attempt. Questions asked during a suicide assessment may include:

  • Have you ever felt so bad that you thought you would like to go to sleep and never wake up?
  • Have you ever felt so bad that you thought you would be better off dead?
  • Have you ever thought that you are a burden on your family and friends or that your family and friends would be better off without you?
  • Has someone close to you died by suicide?
  • Do you notice that you've been drinking more alcohol (or using more drugs) than usual or taking chances that you might not have taken before?
  • Have you ever thought about hurting or killing yourself?
  • Have you ever tried to hurt or kill yourself?
  • Do you ever hear voices telling you to hurt or kill yourself?
  • Have you tried to hurt or kill yourself?
  • What stops you from hurting or killing yourself?
  • If you ever thought of hurting or killing yourself, how would you do it?

If a person has thoughts of harming himself or herself, the health professional always asks if he or she has access to the materials needed to follow through with those plans.

If a depressed person has thoughts of suicide, a plan for suicide, and access to the materials needed to follow through with the plan, he or she is at great risk and should be admitted to a hospital for safety.

Take any mention of suicide seriously. If someone you know is threatening to commit suicide, get help right away. To learn more, see Suicidal Thoughts or Threats .

Related Information

Credits

ByHealthwise Staff

Primary Medical Reviewer John Pope, MD - Pediatrics

Specialist Medical Reviewer David A. Axelson, MD - Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

Current as ofNovember 14, 2014