doxorubicin liposomal

Pronunciation: DOX oh ROO bi sin LYE poe SOE mal

Brand: Doxil

What is the most important information I should know about doxorubicin liposomal?

Doxorubicin liposomal may cause dangerous effects on your heart. Call your doctor at once if you feel very weak or tired, or have fast heartbeats, shortness of breath (even with mild exertion), or swelling in your ankles or feet.

Tell your caregivers right away if you have side effects during the injection, such as fever, chills, trouble breathing, feeling light-headed, chest pain or tightness, fast heartbeats, swelling in your face, or blue-colored skin, lips, or nails.

What is doxorubicin liposomal?

Doxorubicin liposomal is used to treat ovarian cancer, AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma, and multiple myeloma.

Doxorubicin liposomal may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before receiving doxorubicin liposomal?

You should not use this medication if you are allergic to doxorubicin.

Tell your doctor if you have ever had:

  • kidney or liver disease;
  • heart disease; or
  • radiation treatment to your chest.

Tell your doctor about all other cancer medicines or radiation treatments you have received in the past.

Long-term use of doxorubicin liposomal may increase your risk of developing certain other types of mouth cancer. Ask your doctor about your specific risk.

You may need to have a negative pregnancy test before starting this treatment.

Both men and women using this medicine should use effective birth control to prevent pregnancy. Doxorubicin liposomal can harm an unborn baby or cause birth defects if the mother or father is using this medicine.

Keep using birth control for at least 6 months after your last dose. Tell your doctor right away if a pregnancy occurs while either the mother or the father is using doxorubicin liposomal.

This medicine may affect fertility (ability to have children) in both men and women. However, it is important to use birth control to prevent pregnancy because doxorubicin liposomal can harm an unborn baby.

Doxorubicin liposomal may also cause early menopause, depending on your age when you receive this medicine. Ask your doctor about this risk.

You should not breastfeed while using this medicine.

How is doxorubicin liposomal given?

Doxorubicin liposomal is given as an infusion into a vein. A healthcare provider will give you this injection.

Tell your caregivers if you feel any burning, pain, or swelling around the IV needle when doxorubicin liposomal is injected.

If this medicine accidentally gets on your skin, wash it thoroughly with soap and warm water.

Doxorubicin can lower your blood cell counts. Your blood will need to be tested often. Your cancer treatments may be delayed based on the results.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Call your doctor for instructions if you miss an appointment for your doxorubicin liposomal injection.

What happens if I overdose?

Since this medication is given by a healthcare professional in a medical setting, an overdose is unlikely to occur. However, overdose symptoms may include fever, chills, flu symptoms, unusual bruising or bleeding, mouth sores, trouble swallowing, and altered sense of taste.

What should I avoid while using doxorubicin liposomal?

Avoid being near people who are sick or have infections. Tell your doctor at once if you develop signs of infection.

Avoid activities that may increase your risk of bleeding or injury. Use extra care to prevent bleeding while shaving or brushing your teeth.

What are the possible side effects of doxorubicin liposomal?

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Some side effects may occur during the injection. Tell your caregiver right away if you feel feverish, chilled, light-headed, short of breath, itchy, warm or tingly, or have a headache, pain or tightness in your chest or throat, back pain, fast heartbeats, swelling in your face, or blue-colored skin, lips, or nails.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • blisters or ulcers in your mouth, red or swollen gums, trouble swallowing;
  • hand-foot syndrome --pain, redness, numbness, and peeling skin on your hands or feet;
  • low blood cell counts --fever, chills, tiredness, mouth sores, skin sores, easy bruising, unusual bleeding, pale skin, cold hands and feet, feeling light-headed or short of breath; or
  • signs of heart problems --fast heartbeats, shortness of breath (even with mild exertion), feeling very weak or tired, swelling in your ankles or feet.

Doxorubicin liposomal may cause your urine to turn a reddish-orange color. This side effect is usually not harmful.

Common side effects may include:

  • low blood cell counts;
  • fever;
  • feeling weak or tired;
  • loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting;
  • constipation, diarrhea;
  • hand-foot syndrome;
  • rash; or
  • hair loss.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect doxorubicin liposomal?

Other drugs may affect doxorubicin liposomal, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Tell your doctor about all your current medicines and any medicine you start or stop using.

Where can I get more information?

Your doctor or pharmacist can provide more information about doxorubicin liposomal.

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