estradiol and progesterone

Pronunciation: ES tra DYE ol and pro JES ter one

Brand: Bijuva

What is the most important information I should know about estradiol and progesterone?

You should not use this medicine if your uterus has been removed, or if you have: undiagnosed vaginal bleeding, liver disease, a bleeding disorder, if you will have major surgery, or if you have ever had a heart attack, a stroke, a blood clot, or cancer of the breast, uterus/cervix, or vagina.

Estradiol may increase your risk of developing a condition that may lead to uterine cancer. Call your doctor if you have any vaginal bleeding.

Using this medicine can increase your risk of blood clots, stroke, heart attack, or cancer of the breast, uterus, or ovaries. Estradiol and progesterone should not be used to prevent heart disease, stroke, or dementia.

What is estradiol and progesterone?

Estradiol (a form of estrogen) and progesterone are female hormones.

Estradiol and progesterone is a combination medicine used to treat moderate to severe hot flashes caused by menopause.

This medicine is for use only in a woman who has not had her uterus removed.

Estradiol and progesterone may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking estradiol and progesterone?

You should not take estradiol and progesterone if your uterus has been removed, or if you have:

  • unusual vaginal bleeding that has not been checked by a doctor;
  • liver disease;
  • an increased risk of having blood clots due to a heart problem or a hereditary blood disorder;
  • a history of heart attack, stroke, or blood clot; or
  • a history of hormone-related cancer, or cancer of the breast, uterus/cervix, or vagina.

Tell your doctor if you have ever had:

  • heart disease, high blood pressure;
  • gallbladder disease;
  • liver problems, or jaundice caused by pregnancy or taking hormones;
  • kidney disease;
  • diabetes;
  • asthma;
  • epilepsy or other seizure disorder;
  • migraines;
  • lupus;
  • endometriosis or uterine fibroid tumors;
  • hereditary angioedema;
  • porphyria (a genetic enzyme disorder that causes symptoms affecting the skin or nervous system);
  • a thyroid disorder; or
  • high levels of calcium in your blood.

Estradiol and progesterone should not be used to prevent heart disease, stroke, or dementia. This medicine may actually increase your risk of developing these conditions.

Estrogens can increase your risk of blood clots, stroke, or heart attack. You are even more at risk if you have high blood pressure, diabetes, high cholesterol, if you are overweight, or if you smoke.

Estrogens may also increase your risk of cancer of the breast, uterus, or ovaries. Talk with your doctor about this risk.

Estradiol and progesterone is not for use in a woman who is pregnant or breast-feeding.

How should I take estradiol and progesterone?

Follow all directions on your prescription label and read all medication guides or instruction sheets. Use the medicine exactly as directed.

Take with food.

If you need major surgery or will be on long-term bed rest, you may need to stop using this medicine for a short time. Any doctor or surgeon who treats you should know that you are using estradiol and progesterone.

Call your doctor if you have any unusual vaginal bleeding.

Your doctor should check your progress on a regular basis (every 3 to 6 months) to determine whether you should continue this treatment. Self-examine your breasts for lumps on a monthly basis and have a mammogram every year while using estradiol and progesterone.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the medicine (with food) as soon as you can, but skip the missed dose if your next dose is due in less than 2 hours. Do not take two doses at one time.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid while taking estradiol and progesterone?

Avoid smoking. It can greatly increase your risk of blood clots, stroke, or heart attack while using this medicine.

Grapefruit may interact with this medicine and lead to unwanted side effects. Avoid the use of grapefruit products.

What are the possible side effects of estradiol and progesterone?

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • heart attack symptoms --chest pain or pressure, pain spreading to your jaw or shoulder, nausea, sweating;
  • signs of a stroke --sudden numbness or weakness (especially on one side of the body), sudden severe headache, slurred speech, problems with vision;
  • signs of a blood clot --sudden vision loss, feeling short of breath, coughing up blood, pain or warmth in one or both legs;
  • swelling, rapid weight gain;
  • jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);
  • unusual vaginal bleeding, pelvic pain;
  • a lump in your breast; or
  • high levels of calcium in your blood --nausea, vomiting, constipation, increased thirst or urination, muscle weakness, bone pain, lack of energy.

Common side effects may include:

  • pelvic pain;
  • vaginal bleeding or discharge;
  • breast tenderness; or
  • headache.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect estradiol and progesterone?

Sometimes it is not safe to use certain medications at the same time. Some drugs can affect your blood levels of other drugs you take, which may increase side effects or make the medications less effective.

Many drugs can interact with estradiol and progesterone. This includes prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible interactions are listed in this medication guide. Tell your doctor about all your current medicines and any medicine you start or stop using.

Where can I get more information?

Your pharmacist can provide more information about estradiol and progesterone.

This information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise, Incorporated, disclaims any warranty or liability for your use of this information. Your use of this information means that you agree to the Terms of Use. Learn how we develop our content.

Healthwise, Healthwise for every health decision, and the Healthwise logo are trademarks of Healthwise, Incorporated.