romidepsin

Pronunciation: ROE mi DEP sin

Brand: Istodax

What is the most important information I should know about romidepsin?

Use only as directed. Tell your doctor if you use other medicines or have other medical conditions or allergies.

What is romidepsin?

Romidepsin is used to treat T-cell lymphoma affecting the skin (cutaneous T-cell lymphoma).

Romidepsin is given after at least one other cancer treatment did not work or has stopped working.

Romidepsin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before receiving romidepsin?

Tell your doctor if you have ever had:

  • heart problems or a heart rhythm disorder;
  • long QT syndrome (in you or a family member);
  • kidney disease;
  • liver disease (especially hepatitis B);
  • an electrolyte imbalance (such as high or low levels of potassium or magnesium in your blood); or
  • if you are sick with nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea.

You may need to have a negative pregnancy test 7 days before starting this treatment.

Both men and women using this medicine should use effective birth control to prevent pregnancy. Men should use condoms. Romidepsin can harm an unborn baby if the mother or father is using this medicine.

Keep using birth control for at least 1 month after your last dose. Tell your doctor right away if a pregnancy occurs.

Romidepsin can make hormonal birth control less effective, including birth control pills, injections, implants, skin patches, and vaginal rings. Use barrier birth control to prevent pregnancy: condom, diaphragm, cervical cap, or contraceptive sponge.

Pregnancy may be less likely to occur while the mother or the father is using this medicine. Both men and women should still use birth control to prevent pregnancy because the medicine can harm an unborn baby.

You should not breastfeed while using this medicine, and for at least 1 week after your last dose.

How is romidepsin given?

Romidepsin is injected into a vein by a healthcare provider.

This medicine must be given slowly over 4 hours.

Romidepsin is given in a 28-day treatment cycle. You will receive an injection only on certain days of this cycle.

You may be given other medicine to prevent nausea or vomiting while you are receiving romidepsin.

Drink plenty of liquids in the 3 days after each injection.

You may get infections more easily, even serious or fatal infections. You will need frequent medical tests. Your heart function may also need to be checked

If you've had hepatitis B, it may come back or get worse. You may need liver function tests while using this medicine and for several months after you stop.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Call your doctor for instructions if you miss an appointment for your romidepsin injection.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid while receiving romidepsin?

Follow your doctor's instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity.

What are the possible side effects of romidepsin?

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

You may get infections more easily, even serious or fatal infections, during and after treatment. Call your doctor right away if you have signs of infection such as:

  • fever, flu symptoms, muscle aches;
  • worsening skin symptoms;
  • burning when you urinate; or
  • cough, chest discomfort, feeling short of breath.

Also call your doctor at once if you have:

  • chest pain, feeling short of breath;
  • fast or pounding heartbeats, fluttering in your chest, sudden dizziness (like you might pass out);
  • low blood cell counts --fever, chills, tiredness, mouth sores, skin sores, easy bruising, unusual bleeding, pale skin, cold hands and feet, feeling light-headed or short of breath;
  • signs of tumor cell breakdown --tiredness, weakness, muscle cramps, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, fast or slow heart rate, tingling in your hands and feet or around your mouth.

Common side effects may include:

  • low blood cells counts, infections;
  • nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite;
  • constipation;
  • itching;
  • tiredness; or
  • changes in your sense of taste.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect romidepsin?

Romidepsin can cause a serious heart problem. Your risk may be higher if you also use certain other medicines for infections, asthma, heart problems, high blood pressure, depression, mental illness, cancer, malaria, or HIV.

Tell your doctor about all your current medicines. Many drugs can affect romidepsin, especially:

  • dexamethasone or other steroid medicine;
  • St. John's wort;
  • an antibiotic or antifungal medicine;
  • an antidepressant;
  • a blood thinner (warfarin, Coumadin, Jantoven);
  • heart rhythm medicine;
  • HIV or AIDS medicine;
  • seizure medicine; or
  • tuberculosis medicine.

This list is not complete and many other drugs may affect romidepsin. This includes prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible drug interactions are listed here.

Where can I get more information?

Your doctor can provide more information about romidepsin.

This information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise, Incorporated, disclaims any warranty or liability for your use of this information. Your use of this information means that you agree to the Terms of Use. Learn how we develop our content.

Healthwise, Healthwise for every health decision, and the Healthwise logo are trademarks of Healthwise, Incorporated.