trimipramine

Pronunciation: trye MI pra meen

Surmontil

slide 1 of 9, Surmontil,

25 mg, capsule, blue/yellow, imprinted with OP, 718

Image of Surmontil
slide 1 of 9

Surmontil

slide 2 of 9, Surmontil,

50 mg, capsule, blue/orange, imprinted with OP, 719

Image of Surmontil
slide 2 of 9

Surmontil

slide 3 of 9, Surmontil,

100 mg, capsule, blue/white, imprinted with OP, 720

Image of Surmontil
slide 3 of 9

Trimipramine Maleate

slide 4 of 9, Trimipramine Maleate,

100 mg, capsule, blue/white, imprinted with A 295

Image of Trimipramine Maleate
slide 4 of 9

Trimipramine Maleate

slide 5 of 9, Trimipramine Maleate,

100 mg, capsule, blue/white, imprinted with TR100

Image of Trimipramine Maleate
slide 5 of 9

Trimipramine Maleate

slide 6 of 9, Trimipramine Maleate,

25 mg, capsule, blue/yellow, imprinted with A 293

Image of Trimipramine Maleate
slide 6 of 9

Trimipramine Maleate

slide 7 of 9, Trimipramine Maleate,

25 mg, capsule, blue/yellow, imprinted with TR25

Image of Trimipramine Maleate
slide 7 of 9

Trimipramine Maleate

slide 8 of 9, Trimipramine Maleate,

50 mg, capsule, blue/orange, imprinted with A 294

Image of Trimipramine Maleate
slide 8 of 9

Trimipramine Maleate

slide 9 of 9, Trimipramine Maleate,

50 mg, capsule, blue/orange, imprinted with TR50

Image of Trimipramine Maleate
slide 9 of 9

What is the most important information I should know about trimipramine?

You should not take trimipramine if you recently had a heart attack.

Do not use trimipramine if you have used an MAO inhibitor in the past 14 days, such as isocarboxazid, linezolid, methylene blue injection, phenelzine, rasagiline, selegiline, or tranylcypromine.

Some young people have thoughts about suicide when first taking an antidepressant. Stay alert to changes in your mood or symptoms. Report any new or worsening symptoms to your doctor.

What is trimipramine?

Trimipramine is a tricyclic antidepressant that is used to treat symptoms of depression.

Trimipramine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking trimipramine?

You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to trimipramine, or if:

  • you recently had a heart attack; or
  • you are allergic to antidepressants such as amitriptyline, amoxapine, clomipramine, desipramine, doxepin, imipramine, nortriptyline, or protriptyline.

Do not use trimipramine if you have used an MAO inhibitor in the past 14 days. A dangerous drug interaction could occur. MAO inhibitors include isocarboxazid, linezolid, methylene blue injection, phenelzine, rasagiline, selegiline, tranylcypromine, and others.

Tell your doctor if you have used an "SSRI" antidepressant in the past 5 weeks, such as citalopram, escitalopram, fluoxetine (Prozac), fluvoxamine, paroxetine, sertraline (Zoloft), trazodone, or vilazodone.

Tell your doctor if you have ever had:

  • bipolar disorder (manic-depression) or schizophrenia;
  • mental illness or psychosis;
  • liver disease;
  • heart disease;
  • a heart attack or stroke;
  • a seizure;
  • overactive thyroid;
  • diabetes (trimipramine may raise or lower blood sugar);
  • narrow-angle glaucoma; or
  • problems with urination.

Be sure your doctor knows if you also take stimulant medicine, opioid medicine, herbal products, or medicine for depression, mental illness, Parkinson's disease, migraine headaches, serious infections, or prevention of nausea and vomiting. These medicines may interact with trimipramine and cause a serious condition called serotonin syndrome.

Some young people have thoughts about suicide when first taking an antidepressant. Your doctor should check your progress at regular visits. Your family or other caregivers should also be alert to changes in your mood or symptoms.

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.

Trimipramine is not approved for use by anyone younger than 18 years old.

How should I take trimipramine?

Follow all directions on your prescription label and read all medication guides or instruction sheets. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose. Use the medicine exactly as directed.

It may take up to 4 weeks before your symptoms improve. Keep using the medication as directed and tell your doctor if your symptoms do not improve.

If you need surgery, tell your surgeon you currently use this medicine. You may need to stop for a short time.

Do not stop using trimipramine suddenly, or you could have unpleasant withdrawal symptoms. Ask your doctor how to safely stop using trimipramine.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Keep the bottle tightly closed when not in use.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the medicine as soon as you can, but skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next dose. Do not take two doses at one time.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222. An overdose of trimipramine can be fatal.

Overdose symptoms may include irregular heartbeats, severe drowsiness, confusion, hallucinations, agitation, stiff muscles, overactive reflexes, vomiting, feeling hot or cold, vision problems, feeling like you might pass out, seizures, or coma.

What should I avoid while taking trimipramine?

Drinking alcohol with this medicine can cause side effects.

Avoid driving or hazardous activity until you know how this medicine will affect you. Your reactions could be impaired.

Trimipramine could make you sunburn more easily. Avoid sunlight or tanning beds. Wear protective clothing and use sunscreen (SPF 30 or higher) when you are outdoors.

What are the possible side effects of trimipramine?

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Report any new or worsening symptoms to your doctor, such as: mood or behavior changes, anxiety, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, or if you feel impulsive, irritable, agitated, hostile, aggressive, restless, hyperactive (mentally or physically), more depressed, or have thoughts about suicide or hurting yourself.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • tunnel vision, eye pain or swelling, or seeing halos around lights;
  • a light-headed feeling, like you might pass out;
  • new or worsening chest pain, pounding heartbeats or fluttering in your chest;
  • confusion, unusual thoughts or behavior;
  • a seizure (convulsions);
  • painful or difficult urination;
  • easy bruising, unusual bleeding;
  • restless muscle movements in your eyes, tongue, jaw, or neck; or
  • fever, chills, sore throat, mouth sores, feeling light-headed.

Seek medical attention right away if you have symptoms of serotonin syndrome, such as: agitation, hallucinations, fever, sweating, shivering, fast heart rate, muscle stiffness, twitching, loss of coordination, nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea.

Common side effects may include:

  • increased blood pressure;
  • numbness or tingling in your hands or feet;
  • dry mouth, nausea, vomiting;
  • rash, itching;
  • breast swelling (in men or women); or
  • abnormal liver function tests.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect trimipramine?

Using trimipramine with other drugs that make you drowsy can worsen this effect. Ask your doctor before using opioid medication, a sleeping pill, a muscle relaxer, or medicine for anxiety or seizures.

Tell your doctor about all your other medicines, especially:

  • medicine to treat depression, anxiety, mood disorders, or mental illness;
  • cold or allergy medicine (Benadryl and others);
  • medicine to treat Parkinson's disease;
  • medicine to treat stomach problems, motion sickness, or irritable bowel syndrome;
  • medicine to treat overactive bladder; or
  • bronchodilator asthma medication.

This list is not complete. Other drugs may affect trimipramine, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible drug interactions are listed here.

Where can I get more information?

Your pharmacist can provide more information about trimipramine.

This information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise, Incorporated, disclaims any warranty or liability for your use of this information. Your use of this information means that you agree to the Terms of Use. Learn how we develop our content.

Healthwise, Healthwise for every health decision, and the Healthwise logo are trademarks of Healthwise, Incorporated.